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Christman Kelley & Clarke, PC | Christman, Kelley & Clarke, PC resolve, multi-million dollar, swimming pool case after picking a favorable Monterey County jury
law firm sues contractors for negligent construction and defects arising out of pool construction. Pool negligently lacked equipotential bonding resulting in potential for electrocution and could not be used until fully repaired.
lawsuit, defective, swimming pool, construction defect, electrocution, bonding
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Christman, Kelley & Clarke, PC resolve multi-million dollar swimming pool case after picking a favorable Monterey County jury

 

Christman, Kelley & Clarke, PC resolve multi-million dollar swimming pool case after picking a favorable Monterey County jury

Posted by Legal Team in Civil Litigation Law in California, Law Blog for California and Texas, Law Questions by California Cities, Uncategorized 11 Apr 2016

After litigating the matter for many years, including obtaining a reversal of the trial court’s dismissal of some defendants in the Sixth District Court of Appeal in Santa Clara, California, Christman, Kelley & Clarke, PC began picking a jury in a remote courthouse in Monterey County.  CKC’s finesse in the jury selection process revealed a favorable jury which pushed the defendants toward final resolution.  All told, CKC collected several million dollars from the general contractor and numerous subcontractors who had constructed a very expensive pool which the property owner could never use.  Shortly after construction, a principal subcontractors felt a “tingling” sensation in his hand when he inserted a metal pole into the pool water.  That subcontractor told the owner not to use the pool.  The contractors committed a fatal error when constructing the pool – they failed to properly establish equipotential bonding of the pool’s metal components.  Equipotential bonding is the pool’s main safety system which prevents deadly electrocutions when voltage may be introduced into the pool by lightning, power lines or other sources.

An effective team of top experts in their field assisted CKC’s effective representation of the client:

-Michael Shotwell, AIA, Sharpsburg, GA 30277

-Michael Sorenson, California Pools – San Gabriel, 3106 E Garvey Avenue South, #A, West Covina, CA 91791

-Douglas R. Ferrell, P.E., Patrell Engineering Group, Inc., 751 Sunny Grove Lane, Glendora, CA  91741

-Bob Herzig, P.E., Herzig Engineering Consulting Engineering Services, Nashua Office Building – Suite 104, 11108 North Oak Street Trafficway, Kansas City, MO  64155

-Paolo (Paul) Benedetti, Aquatic Technology, P.O. Box 130, Morgan Hill, CA 95038-0130

-Kevin L Humphrey, Exact One Enterprises, Inc., dba Current Pro Electric, C-10  770282, 13430 Trego Street, Sylmar, CA  91342

If anyone has any questions about equipotential bonding or defective construction of swimming pools in general, don’t hesitate to ask.

Dugan@christmankelley.com